Rent Downton Abbey (2019)

3.4 of 5 from 369 ratings
1h 57min
Rent Downton Abbey Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
The worldwide phenomenon, 'Downton Abbey', returns in a spectacular motion picture, as the beloved Crawleys and their intrepid staff prepare for the most important moment of their lives. A royal visit from the King and Queen of England unleashes scandal, romance and intrigue that leave the future of Downton hanging in the balance. Written' by series creator Julian Fellowes and starring the original cast, this grand cinematic experience will have you cheering for your favourite characters all over again.
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
Julian Fellowes, Gareth Neame, Liz Trubridge
Writers:
Julian Fellowes
Studio:
Universal Pictures
Genres:
British Films, Drama, Romance
Countries:
UK
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/01/2020
Run Time:
117 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Upstairs and Downstairs Cast Conversations
  • The Royal Visit
  • True to the Twenties
  • Welcome to Downton Abbey
  • The Brilliance of Julian Fellowes
  • Feature Commentary with Director Michael Engler
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/01/2020
Run Time:
122 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Upstairs and Downstairs Cast Conversations
  • The Royal Visit
  • True to the Twenties
  • Welcome to Downton Abbey
  • The Brilliance of Julian Fellowes
  • Feature Commentary with Director Michael Engler
BBFC:
Release Date:
Not released
Run Time:
122 minutes

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Reviews (11) of Downton Abbey

Birdbath - Downton Abbey review by JH

Spoiler Alert
30/01/2020

As shallow as a birdbath but quite fun - particularly Maggie Smith's character! It is all a bit forelock tugging, and 'yes sir I know my place', but at least there is a gay sub-plot, which adds a drop of depth. Perhaps this is just the sort of tosh a new Britain deserves?

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

20 Minutes too Long - Downton Abbey review by AA

Spoiler Alert
06/02/2020

As a lover of the TV series I was eagerly awaiting the DVD of the film, and having watched it, 20 minutes of the film could have been culled and would have provided a much tighter film whilst at the same time getting the message over!

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Undemanding fun - Downton Abbey review by JR

Spoiler Alert
Updated 15/02/2020

Maggie Smith gets the funniest lines in this upstairs downstairs comedy of manners. It is as polished as the family silver and as light as one of Mrs Patmore's souffles.

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Not as good as the TV series - Downton Abbey review by RS

Spoiler Alert
21/08/2020

Being a big fan of Downton the TV series I was very much looking forward to the film, though a bit sceptical about the transition from small screen to big screen (many successful TV series have not made the transition to the big screen very well). Filmed beautifully of course, with the cast returning to the roles convincingly, I found the main storyline a little weak and pointless___ it didn't hold me gripped as the TV series had done. I hope they don't decided to make another film as I don't think they can possibly equal the series or even this film. For me___ leave Downton where it belongs....

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Downton Abbey review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

The return to Downton Abbey presents itself more as a scattershot homecoming than a touching finale. Much akin to the Absolutely Fabulous movie, this reunion special of sort brings all the familiar faces back of upper-class wealth, the abbey staff, and royalty for a 1927 era romp. We get all the familiar melodramatic beats of swirling affairs as well as some tension of the times. But with a film bursting with dozens of cast members and a script that includes B, C, D and E plots, the result is a mixed bag of pleasing costume drama and fizzling period piece commentary.

The film begins with what I like to call Period Piece Porn. When Downton Abbey receives a letter about the King and Queen coming for a visit, we don’t see the letter arriving at the abbey. We see the letter being written in fine ink. That letter is then handed off to a royal footman. That letter is then placed on an old-fashioned train. That train takes it to a 1920s post office. And so on. Such is the alluring camera work of Downton Abbey, never missing an opportunity to zoom in on something decadent. So when butlers bring out food for dinner, you better believe we’re going to get an eye-full of that platter.

Anyway, with the King and Queen coming, there’s a lot going on within the Scottish town. A political player arrives who may or may not be involved with an assassination attempt on the King. Intriguing but don’t get too attached. This is just one of many compelling arcs that start with unique ideas and are then quickly resolved before they get good. An assassin reveals himself and questions the political problems of the town just before he is hauled away and never to be heard from again. One member of the abbey ventures to a secret gay club and avoids being arrested in a raid because of his credentials, only briefly harping on how tough it is to be secretly homosexual in such a time. Perhaps the most troubling is the plot of a thieving seamstress. She is caught and blackmailed into finishing a dress overnight, her plight of questioning the class structure shut down far too early.

Part of me wants to see these plots play out but another part of me understands why they’re reserved to being mini-arcs. Clearly the focus is more on the drama within Downton Abbey and it’s clearly the bigger strength of the picture. The most vivid plotline is that of the abbey staff being shoved aside by the royal staff. Irritated they’ll never be able to serve the King and Queen, which may be the highest honor of their entire lives, they stage a mischievous scheme to send the royal staff out on errands and locked in their rooms. It’s especially fun to watch these scenes play out with the wonderful Mr. Carson (Jim Carter) returning once more with charm and sterness, reluctant to go ahead with such schemes.

The whole cast puts their best foot forward in the most gorgeous of outfits but there’s clearly one major star of this picture and she happens to be the oldest. You just can’t get around this film without talking about Maggie Smith as the abbey’s Dowager Countess. Every scene she occupies she eats everyone alive with her words that cut deep and always have the best wit. It’s especially fun to watch her butt heads with Imelda Staunton as Lady Bagshaw as they bicker of heirs. There was so much going on in this picture but it becomes pretty clear the main event was Smith vs. Staunton (or at least that’s what I wanted out of the picture).

The film ends with the possibility of more Downton Abbey but I’m reluctant for a return visit given such a distance it keeps from juicier plots that are treated more as fluff than intrigue. I’m just saying there was ample opportunity here for the abbey to go up in flames when the boiler breaks down twice and is then forgotten about. Imagine how dramatic that ending would be, where the family watches the abbey burn to the ground, only for Smith to mention “The real Downton Abbey will always be in our hearts.”

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