Rent Finding Your Feet (2017)

3.5 of 5 from 467 ratings
1h 46min
Rent Finding Your Feet Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
When Lady Sandra Abbott (Imelda Staunton) discovers that her husband is having an affair, she seeks refuge with her estranged, bohemian sister Bif (Celia Imrie). As a fish out of water, Sandra is at odds with her sister's free-spirited lifestyle, until she is persuaded to join Bif's dance class. Here, Bif and her friends Charlie (Timothy Spall), Jackie (Joanna Lumley) and Ted (David Hayman) show Sandra that retirement is in fact only the beginning, and that divorce might just give her a whole new lease of life and love.
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
Andrew Berg, Meg Leonard, Nick Moorcroft, John Sachs, James Spring, Charlotte Walls
Writers:
Meg Leonard, Nick Moorcroft
Studio:
E1 Entertainment
Genres:
British Films, Comedy, Romance
Countries:
UK
BBFC:
Release Date:
25/06/2018
Run Time:
106 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Interviews with the Cast and Crew
BBFC:
Release Date:
25/06/2018
Run Time:
111 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Interviews with the Cast and Crew

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Reviews (18) of Finding Your Feet

Brilliant - Finding Your Feet review by Rm

Spoiler Alert
03/08/2018

I was a bit concerned that this might be a wincing disaster, but no, I was wrong. While it starts a bit slow it steadily sucks you in until you're intrigued to find out what happens next. The plot throws you around from laughter to sadness, but it just works. This could so easily have gone so wrong, but a superb cast and some tidy editing bring it all to a very satisfying conclusion. Make sure you have some tissues around btw, but don't worry, it's mainly for the laughter and the wonderful sentiment.

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Oldies galore.......... - Finding Your Feet review by NC

Spoiler Alert
16/08/2018

Not the best use of the old pals. Maybe too many oldies at once? Lady in van worked well. One top player at a time may be a good rule?

Bit simplistic in places. Lady has stage 4 cancer, takes a few tablets, sometimes a bit dizzy, then dies in sleep when on a beano.........no 10 months wasting away in a Hospice then...........

1 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

A little predictable, but still very enjoyable - Finding Your Feet review by Champ

Spoiler Alert
20/09/2018

There's nothing groundbreaking or new about this film, and in many ways it is a very typical British comedy-drama. But it does have a great cast, and they are all at the top of their game, managing to turn in very good performances with a somewhat variable script. The humour was laugh-out-loud funny, and the sad parts were sad enough to elicit a tear from this viewer.

This film fits the audience demopgraphic establised by Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, and if you liked that you will definitely like this. I did.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Finding Your Feet review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

I suppose it was only a matter of time before we saw veteran actors Imelda Staunton and Timothy Spall paired up in a cozy mid-life crisis romance. It’s been a rising subgenre over the years of a quirky comedy where men and women who feel their best days are behind them find that they can still have fun, dating and dancing with a youthful spirit that remains strong. The most you can hope from this familiar formula is that it doesn’t tread down misguided alleys of misfire humor. Thankfully, Finding Your Feet plays itself safe enough to be a pleasing romp of older actors making the most of their cuteness.

It’s a loose story that is open enough to allow Staunton some wiggle room to work her charm. She plays a woman who is bitterly devastated to discover that her husband has been cheating on her after all these years of marriage. After the divorce, she feels lost and unsure of what to do with her life, even with her sister played by Celia Imrie providing emotional backup. After struggling to find a new path, she stumbles into a dance class for the elderly. There she meets a somewhat shy Timothy Spall who is going through a similar bout of loneliness when his wife has lost her memory and doesn’t recognize him anymore. He falls for Staunton but doesn’t reveal he’s still technically married, saving that bombshell for the quintessential near-climax reveal.

The story proceeds with a light enough pace to provide a decent balance of the charming and the tragic. When Staunton first discovers her husband’s affair, she is devastated but also explodes into a rant of calling out those who have wronged her. When she falls, we fill for her enough that her eventual outlet after retirement of flash mob dancing and stage productions of showcasing how old people can still bust a move feel warranted. Grimer aspects are treated with grace and dignity, as when Spall struggles to connect with his frightened and forgetful wife and Staunton makes a tearful discovery of one of her best friends succumbing to cancer.

What I found most interesting about the film with how it makes us come around to its concept. From the moment Staunton divorces and spots Spall in dance class, you can pretty much set your watch to how this will all play out, including the ending sequence of her finally running to her true love occurring right on schedule. But that almost seems to be a given of the older-scaled romantic comedy game. And like all romantic comedies, it’s less about the construction and more about the characters. And Staunton and Spall are pretty darn cute as a couple.

Finding Your Feet manages to find a firm grounding of familiar steps to present a capable enough romance for the older crowd. It never goes out of its way to be embarrassing or slapstick-heavy with its comedy, taking care never to go too offensive or too smaltzy. And for marching to a familiar beat, it’s hard to deny the charms that only such accomplished actors could muster from a script so light. Don’t expect this film to wow you or knock you off your feet for the talent assembled but be glad they can still deal out drama and comedy as well in a film that provides such lacking proportions.

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