Rent Still Alice (2014)

3.7 of 5 from 643 ratings
1h 37min
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Synopsis:
Julianne Moore gives a unique, moving and Oscar winning performance as successful linguistics professor Alice Howland who, in the midst of her settled life, discovers she has early onset Alzheimer's disease. As Alice regresses, feeling her memories and personality fading away, she tries to salvage what she can from the remaining moments with her family. Exploring the profound effect that such a devastating revelation can bring, 'Still Alice' is a sincere, sobering and inspiring story about human identity and love.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Caleb Freundlich, Charlotte Robson, ,
Directors:
,
Producers:
James Brown, Pamela Koffler, Lex Lutzus
Writers:
Lisa Genova, Richard Glatzer, Wash Westmoreland
Studio:
Curzon Film World
Genres:
Drama
Awards:

2015 BAFTA Best Actress

2015 Oscar Best Actress

BBFC:
Release Date:
06/07/2015
Run Time:
97 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
None
Bonus:
  • Interview with Cast and Crew
  • Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
06/07/2015
Run Time:
101 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
None
Bonus:
  • Interview with Cast and Crew
  • Trailer

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Reviews (6) of Still Alice

So-so Oscar-winning tearjerker - Still Alice review by PV

Spoiler Alert

The first thing to remember about this movie is that it's based on a book written by a women for women - i.e. an emotional tale designed to connect emotionally to female readers who tend to like soapy, weepy, family stories - which is what this is.

The second thing to remember is that it won an Oscar for Julieanne Moore who stars as the smug academic whose hubris is rewarded/punished by a sad descent into early onset Alzheimer's disease - which used to be called, going doolally and senile (which was much easier to spell, frankly).

And that's it! How much you like this will depend on your gender, I suspect. All about family relationships and how they alter after a diagnosis. Thankfully though this movie is short at just over 90 minutes, so that's a big plus really.

Me - I thought it was so-so, and just reminded me of all those cancer/medical films they sometimes play on daytime TV (I remember one from the late 70s/early 80s about a woman singing downtown who gets cancer. The film never said if crooning the song causes her condition...)

It's also a teeny bit offensive in putting forward the idea that a 50 year old female academic who gets Alzheimer's is a tragedy far greater than an old person getting it. Nonsense. This academic ain't Einstein or Marie Curie - she's a so-so academic who's written a text book, like millions of others. I didn't buy the 'what a great loss to humanity' shtick really. Quite frankly, judging by some of the academics I have known, you wouldn't be able to tell all that much difference if they did get Alzheimer's...

If you want to see Julieanne Moore's best ever performance (which should have won an Oscar), then rent out Map to the Stars, not this.

In a word: 'meh'....

3 out of 8 members found this review helpful.

Intresting Altzheimers - Still Alice review by TJ

Spoiler Alert

Movie tracks an academics decline in mental cognatative function as a result of Early onset Altzheimers disease. I found this film intresting as it also shows how visual recognition is linked to memory and how devastating a loss Altzheimers is in day to day.

I would recommend those with an open mind and don't mind a few tears with their movie viewing.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Superb acting - Still Alice review by DK

Spoiler Alert

A tough story to follow as the ending is inevitable - and not happy. This is a beautifully made film. The acting is amazing, and the story told on many different levels in different ways. Well worth renting

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Still Alice review by Adrijan Arsovski - Cinema Paradiso

Despite its conventional start, narrative linearity and cultural bias in dealing with a global malady – Julianne Moore’s powerful, cogent performance thrusts Still Alice above all lachrymose thresholds that are hard to neglect by anyone who is not barren of sentiments and emotions.

Still Alice’s acting crew packs a solid punch, with actors Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart, Kate Bosworth and finally – Julianne Moore among others – delivering their most honest, sincerest portrayal of a family, albeit stereotypically American one, struck by a family member’s diagnose of early onset Alzheimer’s disease. The straight narrative line is mostly prominent in the first half an hour of the movie, when Alice goes through several universally accepted denial stages of illness, such as fear, anger, grief and acceptance. There’s nothing new in the way of previous portrayals of serious conditions here, except when one witnesses the gravitas of Alice’s deteriorating condition – the sudden realization is harsh and hits almost too hard.

From there onward one cannot help but sympathize with Alice, mostly thanks to Julianne Moore’s convincing performance of a person well aware she’s losing the biggest battle of her life. At first, Alice acts arrogant toward her husband, but deep down one knows she’s afraid: she does the best to try and fight the illness as much as she can, for as long as she can do it. She knows it’s a battle that cannot be won – but continues to resist over a point where most of us would surely break.

Suddenly, the immersion is broken by a rather misplaced statement: “I wish I had cancer”. It can be justified if understood in regard to the character who speaks it, her confusion and disorientation. Any other justification and it becomes unacceptable and immensely out of place.

Also, at times, Still Alice has that infomercial vibe, which in all truth brings people affected by Alzheimer’s disease one step closer to be understood better, but again breaks the immersion set forth by Moore. Those scenes are inherently neither good nor misplaced; rather they feel like someone is reminding the general public to do a preventive screening when possible. Thankfully those scenes are few and far in-between, but still: a screening won’t hurt either.

The strongest point Still Alice makes is one that’s underdeveloped: how does it feel to witness something bad with a possibility to happen to you? The sole thinking of such undesirable outcomes evokes existential angst, and the movie breezes past it – treating it like a subject not yet worth exploring. Still – this is Alice’s life, and for what it is – it deserves one’s unprecedented attention.

To conclude, Still Alice is an emotional, powerful, freakishly real story to which anyone can relate, with an Oscar well-deserved for one of Julianne Moore’s best performances till date.

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