Rent Godzilla vs. Kong (2021)

3.2 of 5 from 202 ratings
1h 49min
Rent Godzilla vs. Kong Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Legends collide as Godzilla and Kong, the two most powerful forces of nature, clash in a spectacular battle for the ages. As Monarch embarks on a perilous mission into fantastic uncharted terrain, unearthing clues to the Titans' very origins, a human conspiracy threatens to wipe the creatures, both good and bad, from the face of the Earth forever.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , Kaylee Hottle, , , , , , , , Nick Turello,
Directors:
Producers:
Alex Garcia, Jon Jashni, Eric McLeod, Mary Parent, Brian Rogers, Thomas Tull
Writers:
Terry Rossio, Michael Dougherty, Zach Shields
Studio:
Warner
Genres:
Action & Adventure, New Releases, Sci-Fi & Fantasy, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/06/2021
Run Time:
109 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Dutch, English, English Hard of Hearing, French, German, German Hard of Hearing, Italian, Italian Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Featurette: Godzilla Attacks
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/06/2021
Run Time:
113 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, Hindi Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Bulgarian, Cantonese, Castillian, Chinese, Complex Mandarin, Czech, Danish, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian Hard of Hearing, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Swedish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Commentary by Director Adam Wingard
  • 10 Featurettes - Over an Hour of Excitement - Including:
  • The Phenomenon of Gojira, King of the Monsters / The Evolution of Kong, Eighth Wonder of the World Round One: Battle at Sea / Round Two: One Will Fall
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/06/2021
Run Time:
113 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, French Dolby Atmos, French Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Atmos, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Hindi Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Bulgarian, Castillian, Czech, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, French, German Hard of Hearing, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Polish, Romanian
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Commentary by Director Adam Wingard
  • 10 Featurettes - Over an Hour of Excitement - Including:
  • The Phenomenon of Gojira, King of the Monsters / The Evolution of Kong, Eighth Wonder of the World Round One: Battle at Sea / Round Two: One Will Fall

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Reviews (9) of Godzilla vs. Kong

Cartoonish yawn-fest - Godzilla vs. Kong review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
25/06/2021

Maybe I was watching a different film from those who find merit in this blustering bore, played out with clichéd humans and cartoon monsters to orchestral superhero muzak. Admire the cgi… then doze. The humans do little but watch with mouths agape. Teenager Millie Bobby Brown is especially stuck in this mode, and even Rebecca Hall, here phoning in her performance, can find little else for her character to do. Occasionally someone even shouts “Go, go, go!” (always a bad sign). The dialogue is so pointless you could easily switch the sound off and miss nothing. But admire that cgi.

Of course, the film stands or falls on its monster battles, which are all in-yer-face cartoon pyrotechnics aimed at gamers, full of explosions and whizz-bangs. But admire that cgi.

Basically this is a kids’ version of a Godzilla film so perhaps it should not be judged too harshly as adult entertainment. If there is one thing to be said in its favour, it does make you long for an old Japanese Godzilla film with a man in a monster suit.

2 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Beware - BIG spoilers ... - Godzilla vs. Kong review by NP

Spoiler Alert
12/06/2021

King Kong, from the very start of this, is portrayed as the good guy. Endlessly shifted and chained up by the APEX organisation (or corporate human beings in other words), we feel desperately sorry for his plight – especially as he has a special relationship (via sign language) with little Jai. Jai is played by Kaylee Hottle, and in many ways is the star of the show. As cute as a button, she will break your heart. She really will.

Spoilt Maia Simmons (Eiza González), daughter of rich baddie Walter (Demián Bichir) seems to be on an upward curve. Ruthless and stunningly beautiful, she often refers to Kong disparagingly as ‘the monkey.’ She really should know better. After being built up as a force to be reckoned with, it’s supremely satisfying to see ‘the monkey’ end her life without even thinking about it, rendering her mission and her posturing entirely worthless.

So then, when it becomes apparent that the much abused Kong is now a target for Godzilla, we’re instantly on Kong’s side; but Godzilla is supposed to be a (kind of) good buy as well, isn’t he? Not here he isn’t. He’s mean and brutal and goes for Kong relentlessly – and all the big ape wants is ‘home’.

So when (I told you there’d be spoilers) Mechagodzilla turns up, created by APEX, naturally, from the DNA of previous Big Bad Ghidora, it’s Godzilla’s turn to get ragged. And he does. Mercilessly, relentlessly and repeatedly.

Sitting in my cinema seat, a bottle of Coke Zero gone warm in my hands, I’m egging the machine creature on. Hit him, I’m thinking, and again – but the attack does not let up for a second. Godzilla is a spent force, a rag swung about in Mechagodzilla’s metal claw – and still it doesn’t stop. With Kong out of action, this promises to be a measured, horrifying end for the big lad. My allegiances change. This is a bit much, I’m thinking, this is cruelty to animals (forgetting that all this is CGI special effects)! So my sympathies at last drift towards the Big G, floundering and utterly humiliated, along with most of the surrounding architecture.

Even I’m not going to give away the finale, but it as perfect as it could possibly be. Directed by Adam Wingard, who made a valiant attempt to breathe life into The Blair Witch franchise a few years ago, this is an absolute triumph, a stunning looking blockbuster in all senses of the word.

Of these Legendary films, ‘Godzilla’ was good, let down by too many bland humans and not enough monsters, ‘Godzilla King of the Monsters’, was a vast improvement. This, with its sci-fi trappings involving a hollow Earth and Kong portrayed as a genuine king of that world, is absolutely breath-taking. 9 out of 10.

2 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Nice monsters, shame about the humans. - Godzilla vs. Kong review by LC

Spoiler Alert
17/06/2021

Like it's main protagonists, this film is big and dumb - sadly it's only moderately fun. The action is on an epic scale, and the CGI monster fights are colourful and impressive. Granted, that's the main selling point, but it has to be said that the human characters are particularly woeful here, being a bunch of walking cliches with terrible, hammy dialogue. Most annoying are the two children and their bumbling conspiracy-theorist sidekick, who seem to exist only to attempt to add some comedy. There's a potentially interesting storyline here about a hollow earth (why wasn't this tied into the conspiracy guy?), and it looks pretty, but doesn't get explored in any depth. Kong himself is also now so massive in scale that it's hard to maintain any belief in his interactions with the humans (particularly a small child), as they are the equivalent size of an ant - I'm surprised he notices them at all. I thought 'Skull Island' from a few years back was a surprisingly decent film, but this really has nothing to offer other than CGI spectacle.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Godzilla vs. Kong review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Godzilla vs. Kong is thankfully aware of where the strengths of such a giant monster movie lie. Director Adam Wingard is knowing enough that audiences are not coming for family drama, hard science, or strong military action. It’s all about the monsters, at least with this current iteration of the classic movie monsters. And Wingard delivers exactly on the brutal bout audiences have come to expect from such a simply titled film.

There’s just enough of a plot here to warrant a showdown of titans. King Kong is being held in captivity by the Monarch organization, attempting to keep him hidden from Godzilla for fears of two titans battling on Earth for supremacy. Godzilla is attacking the secretive organization of Apex for some mysterious reason. Both organizations of Monarch and Apex are also engaged in penetrating a hidden world beneath Earth’s surface referred to as Hollow Earth, where more monsters may lie. While Kong learns of such power in his hidden place, Godzilla struggles to fight back against Apex trying to develop their giant monsters. A mechanical monster, a Mechagodzilla if you please.

And for most of the film, the humans try their best to not get in the way and stand around to react to the chaos. There’s a few returning characters from Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019) who mostly just investigate and stare in wonder at the discoveries of Apex (and look good while they do it). There’s a deaf girl who finds a way to communicate with Kong via sign language that makes the monster more sympathetic than he was the misunderstood giant ape he was in Kong: Skull Island. I guess four decades can really mellow him out despite being kept in captivity. Of course, all the human characters are present to spell out exposition but only just enough so that the film doesn’t become bogged down in tedious explanations.

Because, really, this is a film that doesn’t require much of that. When everything in the picture ultimately builds up to King Kong using a powered ax alongside Godzilla to take down Mechagodzilla, there shouldn’t be a heavy amount of dialogue to ingest to get to such a point. Just tell us that Mechagodzilla is really the spiritual embodiment of King Ghidorah that has been scientifically revived via his skull and be on your way as the carnage unfolds.

With the film being 80% fights, the showdowns are exciting. We know enough about Kong to like him and root for him to beat back on Godzilla and decimate other monsters he meets along the way. We feel compelled to solve the mystery of Godzilla and why he turned his back on humanity since the previous film. All of their fights are exceptionally staged within the fantastical wilderness of the Hollow Earth to the neon-lit cityscape of Hong Kong where there’s plenty of smashing into skyscrapers. Even the more chaotic fights as with the first match between Godzilla and Kong in the ocean is impressively shot so we always know where the characters are, never becoming lost in shaky handheld shots. This is such a relief considering how reliant the film is on visual effects that proper camerawork is a must, especially after the poorly framed fights of Godzilla: King of the Monsters.

Godzilla vs. Kong is one of the strongest of the Legendary films in this monster saga. It’s nowhere near as compelling a narrative as Shin Godzilla with its more effective commentary on bureaucracy but I suppose that’s rather pie in the sky to hope from American blockbusters more about the smashing than the satire. On this level, it’s hard to not be won over by what such a film is selling and how well it delivers. We’ve come a long way from Godzilla being a cautionary tale of nuclear technology and King Kong being a romantic monster picture. Thankfully, however, we’ve come a bit further than the previous film of King Kong vs. Godzilla. That’s a low bar to pass but, wow, does Godzilla vs. Kong exceed those expectations with flying colors and roaring skirmishes.

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