Rent Searching (2018)

3.5 of 5 from 477 ratings
1h 38min
Rent Searching Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
After David Kim's (John Cho) 16-year-old daughter goes missing, a local investigation is opened and a detective is assigned to the case. But 37 hours later and without a single lead, David decides to search the one place no one has looked yet, where all secrets are kept today: his daughter's laptop. In a hyper-modern thriller told via the technology devices we use every day to communicate, David must trace his daughter's digital footprints before she disappears forever.
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
Sev Ohanian, Natalie Qasabian, Adam Sidman, Timur Bekmambetov, Sofia Maltseva
Voiced By:
Michelle Sparks, Betsy Foldes, Brad Abrell
Writers:
Aneesh Chaganty, Sev Ohanian
Studio:
Sony
Genres:
Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
07/01/2019
Run Time:
98 minutes
Languages:
Czech, English, English Audio Description, Hungarian
Subtitles:
Arabic, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Estonian, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Serbian, Slovakian, Slovenian, Swedish, Turkish, Ukrainian
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Searching for Easter Eggs
BBFC:
Release Date:
04/03/2019
Run Time:
102 minutes
Languages:
Czech, English, English Audio Description, Hungarian, Russian
Subtitles:
Arabic, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Estonian, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovakian, Slovenian, Swedish, Turkish, Ukrainian
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All
Bonus:
  • Searching for Easter Eggs
  • Changing the Language of Film
  • Filmmakers' Commentary
  • Update Username: Cast and Characters

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Reviews (6) of Searching

Watchable - Searching review by KW

Spoiler Alert
02/02/2019

Interesting film about how a father uses his daughters electronic world to try and trace her after she goes missing. Not helped by the police lead officer (very interesting performance from Debra Messing), who has her own private agenda, plus issues with close family members clouding the scene. Not an outstanding film but very watchable for a bad weather day!

2 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Different, but enjoyable. - Searching review by NS

Spoiler Alert
17/02/2019

A enjoyable thriller. A fathers daughter goes missing, as we see things unfold through his computer, I Phone and the tech world everyone lives in. Different, but enjoyable.

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

One issue nearly derails the film - Searching review by DB

Spoiler Alert
Updated 27/09/2019

Very interesting and thoughtful film in the way it is presented. A little like Unfriended from a few years ago but using many more tools to weave through the story. Performances are very good from the key cast members except for Debra Messings character. Completely unbelievable, static and woefully miscast. It does look like she cannot be bothered most of the time, which nearly derails the film completely. Fortunately, the other cast members are watchable and the story holds your attention very well and you genuinely care about what happens. Highly recommended.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Searching review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Searching is not the first film to use the computer desktop environment to weave a technology-bound bottle thriller but it’s certainly one of the best. A lot of films that take advantage of this budgeted format often tend to get lost in the theatrics or try too hard to stir up something fantastical, as seen in the likes of the slasher picture Unfriended and the too-twisty thriller Open Windows. This film is far more grounded and astute that it makes this thriller far more compelling with less questioning of the mechanics.

We’re introduced to the history of a family through various operating systems. Over time, we watch their environments change as much as the Kim family. Daniel Kim (John Cho) raises his daughter Margot with his wife Pamela. Through photos and videos, we see them grow up. Pamela passes away from her long battle with cancer and Margot is soon off to high school. It’s a difficult and different time for Daniel, trying to learn to let go of his daughter who grows more distant from her dad. That is until one night she doesn’t come home. He doesn’t know where she is. She is not responding. Something is wrong.

Daniel tries to find a series of clues as to where his daughter went. Thankfully, even though she wasn’t open with her dad, she had been very open online. Searching through her various online profiles, she slowly peels back a string of friends and actions he never knew about. He thought she was continuing her piano lessons but that was a lie. Her various classmates referred to her as more of an outsider, someone who was very different around her dad. What follows is a twisty plot as the online layers scale back and betrayal is afoot from various angles as the investigation continues.

The film paints an intriguing picture of privacy and how easy it is to turn detective in our online environment. The ease of access allows for Daniel to multitask, getting ready for an online meeting while also learning something devastating about his daughter. He can peer into the background of online chats and pick out clues. He can scan pictures and observe chats and VODs to determine who his daughter was talking with and when. He pokes around various social platforms with the same curiosity of a detective from yesteryear strolling into a scummy back alley to find some info.

Though the thriller takes a twist that is perhaps a tad too odd for the sake of surprise, it never feels like this staging runs itself off a cliff to get goofy with the procedure. Everything within Daniel’s investigation feels real and relatable even if the mysterious plot seems more weak-season CSI. There’s never a moment when the film doesn’t feel engaging and takes the liberties where it needs to in telling a story entirely through media. This is a fairly new subgenre of trying to make modern mysteries more appealing and Searching provides comfort that there will at least be some intelligence behind this format instead of just being online boogeymen stories we’ve received so many times in the past.

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