Rent Loving Vincent (2017)

3.7 of 5 from 532 ratings
1h 31min
Rent Loving Vincent Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
The life and controversial death of Vincent van Gogh as told by his paintings and by the characters that inhabit them. Beginning a year after his demise, this portrait of the artist is built via a series of interviews conducted by Armand Roulin (Booth) - a regular model for the artist's portraits - who becomes obsessed with van Gogh's death, caused by a bullet wound to the stomach. Was it an accident? Was it suicide? 'Loving Vincent' sets out to explore one of art's great mysteries, a unique film created using over over 65,000 hand painted frames and features music from the award winning composer Clint Mansell (The Fountain; Black Swan).
Actors:
, , , Josh Burdett, , , , , , , , , , , , , Piotr Pamula, , Bozena Berlinska-Bryzek, Anastazja Seweryn
Directors:
,
Producers:
Sean M. Bobbitt, Ivan Mactaggart, Hugh Welchman
Voiced By:
Douglas Booth, Jerome Flynn, Robert Gulaczyk, Josh Burdett, Holly Earl, Robin Hodges, Chris O'Dowd, John Sessions, Helen McCrory, Eleanor Tomlinson, Aidan Turner, Saoirse Ronan, Joe Stuckey, James Greene, Martin Herdman, Bill Thomas, Piotr Pamula, Cezary Lukaszewicz, Bozena Berlinska-Bryzek, Anastazja Seweryn
Writers:
Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Jacek Dehnel
Others:
Sean Bobbitt, Ivan Mactaggart
Studio:
Altitude
Genres:
Anime & Animation, Children & Family, Drama, Special Interest
BBFC:
Release Date:
12/02/2018
Run Time:
91 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, Polish
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing, Polish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Bringing 'Loving Vincent' to Life
  • Douglas Booth Interview
BBFC:
Release Date:
12/02/2018
Run Time:
95 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, English LPCM Stereo, Polish DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Polish LPCM Stereo
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing, Polish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Bringing 'Loving Vincent' to Life
  • The Making Of 'Loving Vincent'
  • Kickstarter Project
  • Cast Interviews
  • Production Team Interviews
  • National Gallery Q&A

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Reviews (16) of Loving Vincent

Very Creative - Loving Vincent review by JD

Spoiler Alert
15/02/2018

What a brilliant concept, to show an interpretation of the ending to Van Goughs life, in animated form, useing 1000’s of oil paintings ( by hand) based on Vincent’s actual paintings.

It is a fascinating story and I recommend it to anyone who is interested in art and the wonders of animation.

4 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Perhaps They Will Listen Now?? - Loving Vincent review by Mr Chianski

Spoiler Alert
23/02/2018

What a fantastic work of art this is. To be honest I could sit here and marvel at the way the makers of this film managed to create such a beautiful piece (and it does indeed deserve marvelling), but instead I will just say how much this film moved me in ways I never imagined it would.

Telling the story of the last few days of Vincent Van Gogh's life and what led him to his apparent suicide, this film has important messages on subjects such as mental health and the perils of posthumous notoriety. That the makers of this film managed to do this whilst also presenting every scene in a breath taking oil painting like fashion is what really stands this away from the competition.

I can't really recommend this film highly enough. A true artistic testament to a true genius of a man.

5/5.

3 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

A Tour De Force - Loving Vincent review by JR

Spoiler Alert
14/03/2018

The film is an artistic and technical tour de force. Magically, it immerses the viewer into the swirly world of Van Gogh's paintings. The narrative is episodic and impressionistic, but humane and compassionate.

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Beautiful to watch, story lacking - Loving Vincent review by DB

Spoiler Alert
08/05/2018

Undoubtedly an amazing film to watch in terms of style. It looks stunning, being based on van Goghs painting styles and his works. It's such a shame that there wasn't more time spent on the story or script as nothing much happens at all and the script is extremely light. Ultimately once you are over the shock of the animation style and settle into the film, it becomes rather boring, with no big set pieces, reveals, cliff-hangers or thought provoking moments. As a study of art and an animation style, it is a triumph however as a piece of entertainment, it was actually a little disappointing.

1 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Loving Vincent review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

There’s huge ambition within the very concept of Loving Vincent. Perhaps more ambition than any other animated film of the 21st century. For telling the story of Vincent van Gogh’s death, directors Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman wanted to tell it with oil paintings, where every single frame of the film would be painted on a canvas with the medium. It’s an original and thoughtful approach, unlike anything I’ve ever seen before. But I regret to say I appreciate the film more for the experiment than the film itself.

In truth, I can see traces of other animated films with the use of conceiving the motion through rotoscoped footage. You’ve most likely seen this style of tracing over live-action footage for Richard Linklater’s animated films of Waking Life and A Scanner Darkly. To the films credit, there’s an astonishing amount of details in these thousands upon thousands of oil paintings, going so far as photorealism in both its depiction of van Gogh’s classic paintings and matching the actors recorded for their roles. It’s so detailed at times that I questioned the lack of the more painterly definements in several scenes.

The story is told Citizen Kane style. Vincent (Robert Gulaczyk) has passed away and Armand Roulin (Douglas Booth) wants to know why. He speaks with everyone who knew Vincent, from the asylum-housing Dr. Paul Gachet (Jerome Flynn) and the proprietress Adeline Ravoux (Eleanor Tomlinson). He investigates everything around Auvers-sur-Oise, hearing stories of those who knew him best. The scenes of Roulin’s questioning and journey through the beautiful countryside are all depicted in gorgeous colors that use the oil painting medium well. The flashbacks of Vincent’s life, however, are painted in stark black and white.

And here is where the use of oil paintings become questionable. When in color, the film is a wonder to watch as van Gogh’s famous paintings come to life in gorgeous staging. I can only imagine how tough it was to shoot these scenes on film, but seeing them painted and animated adds a whole new level of wonder. But when in black and white, that painterly quality is lost and the more realistic details take over, to the point where I questioned what the point was in such staging. Don’t get me wrong; these scenes have their moments of challenge and beauty as well, as in one scene where Vincent looks at his reflection in rippling water.

I found it hard to watch the film as more than the gimmick itself. Because, let’s face it, the biggest selling point is the animation itself. The ambition is so amazing that when the film settles into its style and turns a little too easy and cathartic in its tribute to Vincent, I felt bad for not feeling something more for a film that was fueled by a passion for painting. Maybe I’m just not as engrossed by the works of van Gogh to truly appreciate a tireless work to take his craft and speed it up for an entire film.

The film is by no means a bore, presenting decent acting and staging that could make the film a competent drama without the animation angle. But only a decent story for such ground-breaking animation feels like an ill-suited pairing. My thanks to the painters who worked tirelessly on this effort and turned out something astonishingly gorgeous, even if it didn’t come in service of the best film.

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